Does Social Bookmarking Need A White List?

stumbleuponOne of the things that seriously chaps my ass is when someone posts my content to a site like StumbleUpon and marks it as porn.

It’s not that I’m not grateful to them for promoting my content, but lets be serious here, I don’t do porn. I write tech and express my opinion.

On Daily Shite it’s all humor. We don’t do anything that even vaguely resembles soft porn, or even nude art, and we won’t even allow a link to a site that we might consider objectionable. We have some very strict policies with regards to the content our authors can publish.

Now, this might not seam like a big problem to most folks. After all who cares if your content is miscategorized as long as it gets promoted?

When it comes to being marked as porn on a service like StumbleUpon, it becomes a very big deal.

When your content is marked as porn it automatically means that  unless somebody has changed their settings to allow them to see adult content when they stumble, then they won’t see it. It also means that if we have to go check and see how our posts are being tagged and categorized everyday in order to fill hit the button that allows you to say the post was miscategorized. This is something we have to do at least once a day.

If we don’t, then you might mess the next great post that goes viral. For us, the post may never go viral when it could have.

Anyway, now that I’m done ranting, I propose a solution. Sites like StumbleUpon, Digg, Reddit etc could implement a white list system.

For example, a site like Daily Shite, which does not have any porn on it, could register our details with these sites and sign an agreement where we list what categories our content could be promoted in (in our case – all except porn) and that would then ensure that users can’t categorize our stuff as such.

Don’t get me wrong, they could still get the category wrong, but at least it wouldn’t be porn and wouldn’t be preventing the post from being viewed by people who don’t have adult content enabled.

If we then want to change our content type at a later date, we need to contact the social bookmarking site or white list or not have it listed.

Also if a site screws up, lets say they start pushing porn when they’ve signed that they won’t, then they can simply have their domain banned for a period of time or indefinitely. Possibly with a review period that would have to be gone through if you want to be back on after you’ve broken the agreement.

Another way to think of it would be like a Twitter verified account, but with the ability to say how your content is categorized and with a punishment in place if you don’t stick to the agreement.

Blogging is x3 times bigger than porn. My ass!

It’s always fun comparing sizes, but this time it think this time the “Technorati State of the Blogosphere” may have popped one to many viagras.

I wasn’t even aware that the “State of the Blogosphere” had begun to be published until Sara pointed me to the TechCrunch article about it and immediately something jumped out at me like large silicon boobs at a swimming contest.

According to the SOTB (I’m not typing the whole damn thing anymore) the average blog generates $6000 dollars a year!

Yep you read that correct! $6000 dollars a year!!!

The majority of bloggers we surveyed currently have advertising on their blogs. Among those with advertising, the mean annual investment in their blog is $1,800, but it’s paying off. The mean annual revenue is $6,000 with $75K+ in revenue for those with 100,000 or more unique visitors per month. Note: median investment and revenue (which is listed below) is significantly lower. They are also earning CPMs.

Um, er WTF? What the hell am I missing here.

Who the feck did they survey? Were these people all lying?

Lets do some simple math here.

If the mean annual revenue per blog is $6000 dollars a year, and 7.4 million blogs posted within the last 120 days.

7,400,000 blogs X $6000 dollars = $44400000000

Um yeah, like really. We’re supposed to believe that blogging is worth $44.4 Billion dollars a year?

Okay, maybe I’m being overly dramatic.

Lets look at the figures from the point of view of blogs which have posted in the past 7 days to avoid the risk of any potential dead blogs.

1,500,000 blogs X $6000 dollars = $9000000000

That’s a staggering 9 billion dollars a year which would imply that the blogging industry is 3 times bigger than the one handed brigade porn industry.

For some reason I don’t quite believe this. So, with your help dear readers, Sara and I would like to get to the bottom of this and get an accurate reflection of what you guys actually earn from your blogs on a yearly basis.

So, if you would be so kind, please fill out the poll below, and we’ll post the results on Wednesday the 1st of October.